Tag Archives: Just saying

It’s Grade Four Long Jump. Not The Answer To Stop World Hunger.

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BY ABBY MAC

I stand on the sideline of the long jump pit measuring the scores of each grade four girl, at the school athletics carnival.  I smile and tell them well done and try to dismiss the obsessive parent in the background who insists in telling each girl their exact measurement, how far behind or in front they are from the previous girl and the exercises they need to do to be a better long jumper.  Then, the teacher makes a crucial mistake.  She asks for volunteers.  That parent I was trying to ignore is now in my face, her necklace jangling and earrings swinging side to side.  She’s bouncing up and down to be selected.  She’s the only one volunteering.

Now she has a job at the long jump.  All she has to do is measure how long each girl jumps.  Round it off to the closest centimetre and if you really want, millimetre.  The first girl jumps, she starts measuring and for the next five minutes debates whether she jumped 1.02 metres or 1.03.  Her two year old son, Miller (???) who is a great “helper”, jumps out in front of the girls each time they’re jumping.  Miller, seems to have trouble to know what the word “no” means, but I am reiterated to that he is a great “helper”.  The mother starts talking to me again, trepidation and excitement mixed in her voice.   Her daughter is about to jump.  Will she meet her PB?  Oh, how nerve-racking?  Her daughter jumps, and just like her brother Miller, doesn’t seem to understand me when I speak.

“You fouled.  I’m sorry.”

This is where you're meant to jump from.

This is where you’re meant to jump from.

 

“I did not foul,” yelled the little girl!

“I don’t think my Lily* fouled,” yelled the mother/volunteer.

“I’m sorry but the rules are you have to jump before the white line.  Lily jumped whilst she was in the sand.  That is way over the line,” I informed them.

 

This is where the little girl jumped from.

This is where the little girl jumped from.

This debate continued for another five minutes, arguing that we could just grant her with the benefit of the doubt.  Eventually, the little girl stormed out of the pit (she actually walked to where she was meant to jump from, which I could technically measure her from there because that was the last footstep in the pit, but I didn’t because it wasn’t the OLYMPICS) and her mother ran over to the tantrum-ing little girl  and reassured her that she was still the best – she would do better on the next jump.  Once their little pep talk was over, the mother raced back over to me where the following conversation took place.

“My Lily, she just gets really sad when she fouls so I just have to make sure she is okay.”

“Right.”

“Yes.  Yesterday, she was doing discus and she threw a really good shot but it was a foul, as well.  The sports teacher there, Mr Clohe*, said that was the best shot he had ever seen and if it wasn’t a foul then it would have been the best discus throw ever.

Because Grade Four discus would compare to something like the Olympics.

“I can imagine.”

“Grace was just great!”

This mother continued with her fascination of being the coolest, most knowledgeable and completely over-rated mum there.  She compared kids in my grade with each other (how does she even know their names?  Her own child is in grade four???) and went on to measure every jump to 1.03792 exactly.  And she annoyed me.  A lot.

I stood at that athletics carnival and had a look at the parents who were there.  I listened to their conversations such as, “I cannot believe the technique they are teaching for shotput!” (Grade Three) and “I was so angry that my child did not get a PB in high jump, yesterday!” (Grade Three, again).  I looked in utter disbelief and thought:

WHAT HAS HAPPENED TO THE WORLD?  WHEN DID ANYBODY CARE IF A SEVEN YEAR OLD DIDN’T MAKE A PB?  THEY’RE SEVEN?  WHEN DID THEY EVEN GET A PB?

Initially, I was just struck in absolute shock and then I became quite angry.  These parents, these obsessed and pressuring parents, are become so fanatical with their child and minor achievements such as the extra 0.000001 they added to their long jump PB that one day, that child will just give up.  That child will feel so much anxiety and pressure to win or get a PB that their fuse will just burn out and in turn, so will they.

This constant obsession that our society seems for our children to be able to play Grade Five piano when they’re five, winning nationals for swimming, cross country and netball, academically receiving A++ in every subject and being socially perfect is just rubbish.  I cannot understand why a parent would choose to inflict such pressure onto their child – such pain for a child to endlessly desire to live up to their parents’ growing, changing and heightening expectations and let their child run until the ends of the Earth just to please, but, nonetheless, it happens.  I see it every day.  I see what the parents want and what the child wants.  I see the polar opposites trying to meet and then one day, everything that child has ever done and the person they have become is stripped.  They get to a point where they can no longer cope with any pressure at all so they let everything go.

 

Let your child grow up.  Let your child lead their own life and nurture their talents, gifts and weaknesses.  Your child should be the most beautiful thing in the world to you, no matter their PB in Grade Four long jump, and if you can’t appreciate them just as they are, then you’re not being a true parent.

 

Did you know any parents who pressure their children?  Do you do it?  Why?  Do your parents pressure you? 

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Uh. Oh. I still have a teddy.

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BY ABBY MAC

It’s time for me to make a confession.  It may change the way you think of me.

I. Still. Sleep. With. A. Teddy. Bear.

I know, I know.  From the looks of other teen’s lives, I should have dropped this relationship when I was 10.  My teddy bear, Honey, and I have been together since I was one.  She has travelled across houses, states and watched me grow up.  She does come with me to my friend’s houses (when I stay the night) but that’s not because I can’t sleep without her.  I take her because I can.

Abby and Honey

Honey and I

Don’t get me wrong, she isn’t secretly hidden in a back-pack wherever I go, we have space.  I don’t play tea parties with her (not that that’s a problem), she isn’t dressed in different outfits every day and she is not in a relationship with another teddy.

She simply lays on bed during the day and when I go to bed, she is tucked underneath my arm and we sleep.  Is there something so wrong with that?  I don’t think so.  According to Parenting-Advice.net, teddy bears support the child and makes the child feel supported and accepted.  They can make the child feel loved and help with emotional distress.  Tick, tick and tick.  That’s what Honey is for me.  But I am no longer a child.

Honey

Honey is excited!

When I was about 10, I stopped bringing Honey away to friend’s houses with me, simply because at that age, people do judge you for it.  You are transitioning between child and tween.  And, at the time, it seemed uncool.  However, I think as a teen with friends who know me very well, I can take Honey to their house and they can bring their unicorn, bear or mouse to my house.  Having a teddy bear, or whatever animal you have, is now something that is funny and just accepted.

I don’t want to leave Honey anytime soon.  Please tell me you feel the same.

Do you have a teddy bear?  When did you stop sleeping with a teddy bear?  How does having a teddy bear make you feel?

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Photos Which Make You Smile.

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BY ABBY MAC

Aren’t there days you just want to smile? Block out all the flaws of the world and look at innocent humour. Today, that is exactly how I feel. For everyone else that craves the same, I have compiled a gallery of photos which can make you smile and brighten up your day. (fullpunch.com)

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What photos make you smile? Add them to our day!

Acts of Kindness.

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BY ABBY MAC

I ask myself everyday whatever happened to the human race. What happened to this evolved race where people could be kind, thoughtful and sincere? What happened to these general actions that are so much easier than being unkind, selfish and insincere?

There are so many actions and things I desperately want to change or help throughout my life. The list varies from domestic violence, bullying, mental health and equality but the first is to revive humanity. To bring back to life simple acts of kindness and generosity. Where it wasn’t a burden for the check-out girl to serve you; a place the elderley can hope for those younger would willingly help them in times of need and where being kind wasn’t exceptional but a way of life.

No matter what type of dream, perfection is the goal at the end. However, perfection isn’t possible or wanted at the same time. Perfection means nothing to work for and improve on; perfection would be a bore. So, when I say I want humanity to be revived, I know that there will be people who won’t follow. Some terrible actions would never cease. It won’t be perfection.

If my first dream, for humanity to be restored, was to be started, it would see aid in solving most, if not all the points on my list. I like to fantasise that it could help see the end to war, terrorism, human trafficking, poverty and homelessness, but unfortunately I can’t spread my ideals too far. Some of those movements are a large battle to fight, and surely one worth fighting for, but at this stage, I shall start small and move in a ripple effect.

Every day, I see people become more disillusioned and acts of kindness are a rarity. Few wave as signal of thanks in cars; show appreciation to the stranger who just picked up the pen they dropped or donate the 5 cents someone else is short. So, when I experienced a genuine act of kindness yesterday, it made me stop. Since, not being used to such things, I wondered whether this person is pranking me or just joking. They were not. It was an act of kindness.

I was miserably failing at Twitter. I tweet every day, I follow other people and I regularly read my home page but I was having trouble gaining followers and creating more interest for the blog, which is my main priority. Anyway, in my normal ‘following’ spree, I actually had someone follow me back – Lisa Andrews. As usual, I sent the normal message thanking them for their follow and to have a look at the blog. Typically, no one replies but Lisa did. She had actually looked at my blog and had taken an interest in what I wrote. It was from there, that Lisa has promoted Growing Pains and me on Twitter and she also helped on a few other things.

One could respond to this in two ways; believe that they are pranking or setting you up or to accept that there is another person in this world with the ability to be kind. I’ll take the latter. Since our society is very much a technological one, more and more acts of kindness will be acted not face to face. Of course, we have to take precautions in protecting ourselves from those who aren’t so kind, but I do believe sometimes we need to accept these acts for what they are.

Lisa didn’t have to say what she did or help me so much. She didn’t have to take her time out for me. But she did. And that’s what means the world to me. Unlike others, I say thank you Lisa for doing what you did. I truly appreciate it.

Every day, I think I become surer that humanity is dead but yesterday I was never so sure that it was so alive.

What do you think of acts of kindness? Do you show them or show thanks for them? Why? How often have you experienced an act of kindness?

 Lisa Andrews is 52 years old turning 53. She lives in Perth, Australia but is originally from Portland, Oregon in America where she trained to be a Real Estate agent. Aged 22 she moved to Perth and studied communications at UWA and is now an Advertising executive and CEO for her company Arangio. She has 3 daughters so she know how important it is for women to follow their dreams. Her twitter is @Lisaandrews1960

We have a different opinion. Can we still be friends?

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BY ABBY MAC

Is it possible, as teens or at any age, to be friends with someone and have differences of opinions? Not just a difference of opinion on a dress or a boy, but on a topic that you are passionate about or directly affects you. Many people often believe that you must be perfectly in sync with all your friends and all share the same opinions and same values. At some time, this delusion of perfect must be corrected. No two people share the exact opinions and values and so therefore no one can be your perfect match, in that aspect.

I watch friendships at school somersault into the depths of no goodbye just because they don’t agree on something or other. They attack each other, not their opinons or reasons. They say things that you can’t take back. Is that really necessary? I try to respect everyone’s opinions, but I often fall flat in respecting their arguments. Uneducated, ignorant arguments make me angry and it is these opinions that I can’t respect.

Difference in Opinon

Can we still be friends? Help.

I was sitting in class and a friend of mine whispered under her breath ‘ew’.
I looked around and said ‘what’?
‘Gays.’
‘What about them?’
‘They’re disgusting.’
‘Why?’
‘They just are.’

Uneducated. Ignorant. And I was angry. This is a fight I decided to pick. I often choose to leave an argument before it starts because it doesn’t affect me or it’s just not worth fighting about, but this one was worth it. I feel very passionately about equality worldwide, whether it is between men and women, adults and children, wealth to poor or homosexual to heterosexual. I believe that everyone is born with equal rights and they deserve to be treated with that respect.
So, as you can imagine, my friend unjustly commenting on homosexuality left me annoyed. Her opinion on homosexuality did not stem from her religion, culture, family up-bringing but her fear and ignorance to gay, lesbian, bi-sexual or transgender persons. She had no reason to hate them or be disgusted by them, but she did all the same. People’s opinions are formed by their religion, culture, family and friends, fear and ignorance. Especially when we are young, our opinions are similar to our parents because that’s all we know. At a young age, all we know is what we are brought up with but her opinion was only influenced with fear and ignorance. Not any other.

I was initially  angry about her opinion and at her. I needed to take a step back and leave it. I needed to sort through and find a position on the difference of opinion and whether it was worth our friendship, time or a fight. Of course, I considered all avenues and realised that it wasn’t worth a fight or our friendship. It was worth understanding, though. Both of ours.

I still don’t completely respect nor understand her opinion and her arguments. But that isn’t worth sacrificing our whole friendship. I try my best to educate her and possibly grant her an opinion that is educated and fair. Not necessarily my opinion or the ‘right’ one, but one that has reasoning behind it. I can’t stop being friends with someone because of their fear and ignorance but I can only hope one day to change it.

It’s difference of opinion which makes friendships diverse and not the same. I think friendship and life would be incredibly boring if everyone felt the same way.

Just as I did, I think one should pick their battles. Deciding to discuss a difference opinion of means you have to be respectful, just like they should for you.

Don’t you agree with me?

Can you still be friends with someone and have a difference of opinion? What do you disagree upon? How do you fix it? Why do you feel this way?

Make-Unders.

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BY ABBY MAC

I love them. I really do adore them. And I think it’s time we brought them to Growing Pains.

I found the idea of having a make-under on the television show ‘Snog Marry Avoid’ where girls (and boys), who wear a little bit too much make-up and buy masking tape as T-shirts, are made-under to their natural and more attractive look. The public is asked at the beginning of the show whether they would snog, marry or avoid that girl (or boy) and once the make-under has been completed the public is asked again. Most times, the majority of the public prefers the made-under version of one girl (or boy).

Even though ‘Snog Marry Avoid’ may seem like a tongue-in-cheek television show, the fundamental idea never ceases to amaze me. The girls that enter the show are completely dependent upon their makeup and skimpy clothes to ‘hide’ what is on the inside; mostly insecurity and self-consciousness.

Public Analysis

Would you snog, marry or avoid her?

I have read many articles which list all the reasons why girls wear make-up and they wear it not because they are insecure about their looks, but because they enjoy wearing it. I get that. Totally. I am not a big make-up wearer (because I don’t know how to apply it) but I do use it on certain occasions; weddings, eating out etc.

For some, make-up is like a hobby or playing sport. It is something that they are thrilled and interested by, however there are people telling them to stop using it, for no reason. I wouldn’t let someone tell me to stop playing hockey or shopping for no sufficient reason because I LOVE to play hockey and go shopping. People feel the same about make-up. Make-up can be worn so the user can look more professional, more polished, coverage from the sun and coverage of blemishes and pimples. But when I see girls of all ages wearing more make-up on their face than I have in my life, I start to question the extreme of this ‘hobby’.

Transformation

Who would you prefer?

That’s why I’m calling for a make-under to all those who can’t even go to sleep without make-up on. I’m not asking for all application of make-up to be immediately stopped, that’s unrealistic and not necessary. But, we need to empower those around us with the knowledge that you don’t need to wear gallons of make-up and instead a light foundation, mascara, concealer, eye shadow and gloss. For whatever purpose you wear make-up for, it doesn’t necessarily improve you. You deserve to feel natural.

Did you know?: Make-up affect people’s skin differently. Though, this does depend on the brand, how long you wear it for and how much you apply. Typically, skin can react in two ways; irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Irritant contact dermatitis can be felt as a burning sensation or itch on the skin, however, the allergic contact is a ‘true’ allergic reaction resulting in sores and blisters.

Make-up can also be the cause of or worsen acne. If make-up is removed by the end of the day and after exercise, your skin won’t react or as badly, however certain oils will have negative effects on your acne.

To avoid all these symptoms, look for make-ups that are oil and fragrance free and hypoallergenic (less likely to cause allergic reactions), noncomedogenic (they won’t block pores – the cause of acne) and nonacnegenic (shouldn’t cause acne).

7 Tips on Make-up:

  1. Eye shadow can sometimes be the worst offender. The skin around this application zone is extremely sensitive and will easily react to eye shadows, kohl pencils and mascaras.
  2. Be careful when rubbing your eyes with nail polish on, this can also affect the sensitive skin around them.
  3. The best way to retain the moisture in your skin is to not use cosmetics every day. Eczema, dermatitis and inflammation around the eyes can also be caused by cosmetics.
  4. Never share your make-up. Even ask for a new sponge when applying make-up at a store. The brushes and sponges will always carry bacteria from the skin. You wouldn’t share a lollipop, would you? So don’t share your make-up brush.
  5. Don’t ever sleep with make-up on. For instance, if you were wearing mascara and the flakes from it fell in your eye; it can cause itchiness, infections or blood shot eyes the next morning.
  6. There are certain ingredients that are used in make-up that can cause harmful repercussions as serious as cancer. They include:
  • Bithionol
  • Mercury compounds
  • Vinyl chloride
  • Halogenated salicyanilides
  • Zirconium complexes in aerosol sprays
  • Chloroform
  • Methylene chloride
  • Chloroflurocarbon propellants
  • Hexachlorophene

8. The preservatives in cosmetics are the second biggest causes of skin problems. Here are some of the preservatives you should avoid:

  • Paraben
  • Imidazolidinyl urea
  • Quaternium-15
  • DMDM hydantoin
  • Phenoxyethanol
  • Formaldehye

Do you wear a lot of make-up? Why? Are you going on a make under? Why do you feel people apply too much make-up?

Abby: Why I Deleted My Facebook Account.

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BY ABBY MAC

Facebook can connect us to friends and family all over the world. It allows us to share photos, videos and information about ourselves and as the viewer; we can like and comment easily on people’s lives. But for me, Facebook can no longer offer this glossy cover. As a teen, it has been infiltrated with hate, misery and falseness which is enjoyable to the people causing it.

I deleted my Facebook account for a variety of reasons but the biggest one was that some of the users, particularly teens, had lost sight of what the true purpose of it was. It was hard every day to see some form of bullying and sadistic comments from these faceless people behind their computer screens.

Media and other adults often portray the biggest threats online to be strange predators that are 50 year old men looking to find you, though they are serious threats, there are other predators which can easily be friends of Facebook; the people that you share your photos, videos and information with, every day.

For me, Facebook was no longer a place of sincerity but teens sharing their lives only to be let down and bullied by their ‘friends’ (friends on Facebook; not necessarily friends in real life).

It seems that your Facebook profile is meant to be perfect and glossy with perfect pictures of yourself, or stupid pictures of yourself which still make you look cute and sexy. But that’s not my life. I don’t take a perfect picture every time. When I look stupid in a photo, I genuinely look stupid not cute and sexy.

Un-Facebookfied

This is un-facebookfied. It isn’t perfect! But look! Do you like my pyjamas?

When I say ‘Facebook’ as a general term, I mean the Facebook world constructed by teens. Facebook, by teens, is no longer about sharing our lives, not the real ones anyway. It is a fake, perfected life for all those ‘friends’ to ‘hate on’ or ‘like’ and then ‘unlike’ only to be mean. You’re not meant to share the photo of you still in your pyjamas eating birthday cake at 9 am but in fact the beautiful, already ‘Instagram(med)’ photo with all your friends wearing high heels and way-too-short dresses in the city. Apparently, I’m unlike the rest of the teenage population on Facebook and don’t own a way-too-short dress (that I wear in the city at 9pm at night) and I don’t celebrate my birthday by taking enough cute and sexy photos to fill a real photo album.

This perfected Facebook life isn’t fair on the rest of us ‘normal’ or ‘unperfected’ people. People like me. People who then strive to have a perfect Facebook page. It became that a lot of photos I took and activities and I joined in on, were based upon what I could get out of it for Facebook. For instance, ‘If I go to this dance, I’ll be able to take these photos with my friends and then upload it onto Facebook’ or I went into this weird extreme place thinking if a photo isn’t good enough to be on Facebook, it was deleted. It didn’t matter whether it was going on Facebook or not.

Facebook-fied

That’s ‘perfect’. No, it’s just boring. My pyjamas were way cooler.

Fake photos, videos and the status updates don’t connect our lives to people. They only share very fleeting parts of our lives that are ‘Facebook-ready’ and are good enough to not be attacked online. The photos that girls put on Facebook with their flat tummies and beautiful bikinis aren’t real. They have most likely stood there for 50 or so shots, with either the peace sign, sitting down or pretending that they don’t know the photo is being taken to find the ‘Facebook-ified’ one. And my least favourite part – when they then have the caption ‘ew my bod is disgusting. just want to die.’ That’s not fair. It’s not fair on so many levels but the biggest one is, they have taken a photo of their beautiful body and then demean themselves in hope to be presented with 189 likes and 67 comments all saying ‘ew no. your bootfiul. i just want to die now.’ or ‘get some ugly.’ It’s these photos and comments which make the rest of us all sit back and be brain washed with all these beautiful girls saying their ugly and as a result, we are feeling twice as ugly as them.

It would be nice to think that Facebook is still living up to its true purpose in the teen world, but it’s not. I can’t stand the bullying and the falseness. People trying to be someone they’re not. Whilst we continue to be tricked that everyone’s life is just so perfect, we will continue to feel how imperfect we are.

Facebook is like a reality show; it’s meant to be real but it is just so fake.

Did you delete your Facebook page? Why? How do you use Facebook? Do you think Facebook is changing?

Simple Pleasures.

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BY ABBY MAC

In a world where we often spend years, or our life, searching for people or items that make us happy, I think it is safe to say, that we could so easily miss simple things that have the potential to make us the most happy. On Christmas Day, I saw so many simple pleasures, many were missed and others were appreciated.

They varied from the care and delicacy one took to wrap the gift (not necessarily the gift), to the true beauty of a meal or the presentation of the dinner table. They made me happy. They made me smile. And they were extremely simple.

Unfortunately, peoples’ lives are cramped with such meaningless tasks and planned pleasures that these simple pleasures can’t be enjoyed. We forget the people we love and dedicate our precious time to those we feel the need to please or will get us somewhere.

When my two cousins arrived on Christmas Day, I found my favourite simple pleasure. The girls arrived with a basket full of different dolls, craft sets and lip glosses, with dazzling smiles which only ever masks faces once a year. They made it hard not to smile at the sight of their grins.

They showed me each doll and why they were so special to them; they chased me with their toy cars and set up games for us to play. I think it was many Christmas’ ago which I was able to ‘play’ with my toys not apply them, wear them or soak up their smells and colours. And I thoroughly enjoyed those games only recommended for children aged 4-12.

Blingled

My Laptop was ‘Blingled’

After we played with all their toys, they asked me what gifts I was given. And so I listed the lotions, candles and gift cards. Most of that seemed rather boring to them, however they were most interested in what I was going to spend my gift card money on. BOXING DAY SALES, OF COURSE! It was then to my delight that the eldest one wanted to go shopping with me. And there was my simple joy. She wanted to spend time with me. Without a true purpose. Not because it was Christmas or a birthday, because we were two friends and wanted to spend time together. That was the most pleasurable joy of my day.

Simple pleasures are so spontaneous and spectacular which make them just so special. They’re missed for other, less important people or tasks, and aren’t often recognised for actually being pleasurable. How can spending time with a 12 and 7 year old be fun, some may say? It’s often presented as a chore, when really it shouldn’t be. It is your privilege to be together. As a family. Safely.

If I think back to when I was 12 and 7, I would have certainly embraced the idea of having a friend or family member, older than me, open to spending time with someone younger – not being a chore. My simple joys are very simple. My cousins feel free to ask for me to spend time with them. And I am more than happy to willingly do so.

Simple pleasures aren’t planned, they’re spontaneous. They’re pleasures which would never strike you as something you would enjoy or notice, however, when they do, they are the most pleasurable pleasures of all.

A Word From Abby…

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BY ABBY MAC

So, I know Jess has already wished you a very, merry Christmas but I think it is polite (and my pleasure) to wish all the Growing Pains readers a happy Christmas, whether it has just begun, lunch is being served or Christmas for you is another 365 days away. I am currently lying on my bed, with my mum fast asleep beside me and the boys are watching a movie which one of them was given for Christmas. Boring? For some. But it’s perfect for me.

Everybody celebrates Christmas differently and I think that is beautiful. Christmas is so wide-spread and understood, yet everyone has a unique was to enjoy it. Last night, we dined at a wonderful friend’s house whom my mother has known for decades and this morning we all woke at a reasonable (enough) hour, unlike Jess, to unwrap plenty of presents given to and by the family. Usually, we would eat out at a restaurant for lunch to save mum the hassle of preparing a dazzling, world-class meal, but this year I really wanted to stay in. I wanted a family-do, where it was just us and quite casual. Instead of devouring a spectacular lunch, we’re keeping it simple and having ham and cheese toasties for lunch… and then, for dinner, getting down to the world-class meals. That’s how we chose to do it this year.

Everyone interprets and chooses their way to spend Christmas, differently. Even the people in your own family. See, my grandmother spent Christmas Eve and morning with us and then madly dashed north-west to her other younger grand children. My brother is up at the crack of dawn and will happily sit at the end of my bed until I wake from feeling creepy eyes watching me. Jess – her family is different again. And so are our neighbours, friends and family. Christmas means something different to every person. Whether that be because of religion, age or values.

So, depending on all those different factors, how do you celebrate or spend Christmas? What do you eat? Where do you spend it? How many presents do you give or receive?

Oh, and no Christmas photos from me. I’m in my pyjamas and it is very early. Too early.

Merry Christmas, once again.

Auto Corrected Text Messages.

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BY ABBY MAC

They’re those text messages that everybody hates. They’re inevitable. But, nevertheless, everybody tries to do their best to avoid them. We read and reread our text messages just make sure our text messages haven’t been ‘auto corrected’ and therefore made that sentence completely incorrect.

One day, my friend ran madly into school, screaming ‘Oh my gosh! I accidentally sent ‘give me sex’ instead of ‘give me a sec’ to Ben [her boyfriend]! Heeeeeeelp!’ Although it isn’t a text message, I almost published a post titled – ‘What do you want from Satan?’instead of ‘What do you want from Santa?’

Though these sorts of mistakes can be humorous (if explained), many don’t result in the way which we ever predicted. Technology is not as instant as speaking face to face and sudden errors like the ones before cannot be so swiftly fixed. What happens if you’re not even aware that you asked for ‘sex’ instead of a ‘sec’?

We’ve compiled a gallery of all those awkward text messages. (damnyouautocorrect.com)

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Just another first world problem to add to the list.

Have you ever sent a text message where silly ‘auto correct’ has ‘helped’ you? Have you received an ‘auto corrected’ message? What do you do?